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The scourge of traffic -- It's only the beginning

If you tried going from downtown to say Kroger or Dairy Queen over the past weekend you likely encountered some pretty heavy traffic with visitors to our Marble Festival. And the next two weekends with the Apple Festival in Ellijay will be similarly wretched up and down Hwy. 515. This is what Atlanta traffic is like all the time. And it's not pretty. 

In October with north Georgia festivals, Pickens County sees tremendous traffic flow from people trying to get away from the city for the weekend. They leave their crowded neighborhoods to trek north for open space, devoid of traffic and the anxiety that comes with it. Or so they think. If you noticed Hwy. 515 last weekend you saw they just brought their traffic north with them.

Atlanta ranks among the most congested cities in the world, according to a recent report by transportation analytics firm INRIX. That’s in the world, not just the United States. According to INRIX's 2016 global traffic scoreboard, Atlanta ranked eighth in the world for congestion with the average commuter spending 70.8 hours in traffic each year. The only ones who benefit from that much time spent in our cars are podcast producers and oil companies. 

Nationally, Georgia's metro area came in fourth and just last year Atlanta was No. 11 on the global list of most congested cities. While Bangkok, Thailand is the most congested city, five American cities rounded out the top 10 in the world, with Los Angeles,  leading the pack.

According to INRIX the top 10 are: Los Angeles with the average commuter spending 104 hours of their life annually stuck in cars; Moscow at 91.4; New York, 89.4; San Francisco, 82.6; Bogota, Columbia, 79.8; Sao Paulo, Brazil, 77.2; London, 73.4; Atlanta, 70.8; Paris, 65.3; and Miami and 64.8 hours.

With Atlantans spending 70 peak hours in congestion, the cost to each driver is $2,212. But the city loses out to the tune of $7.1 billion from lost productivity with workers sitting in traffic. That's a lot of money.

Economic opportunities in Atlanta come at a price and often  seem like a double-edge sword - we love the lifestyle offered by the expanding metro and how easy it is to get to the Fox Theatre for a show or Laughing Skull lounge for some comedy, but when we're stopped in traffic for hours on a Friday evening, it begs to be asked, is it worth it? 

For all the opportunity Atlanta and the metro area afford in terms of business, jobs, and entertainment, we hope the sprawl stops in Cherokee County. But we aren't holding our breath.

Rest assured, private automobile traffic is not going away anytime soon. While it's still largely kept at bay here in Pickens County, due to our mileage from Atlanta, the growth already coming to north Cherokee County in places like Ball Ground, will eventually spill over here. 

The folks down in Canton who spend exorbitant amounts of time on Hwy. 20 moving from the interstate to their cookie-cutter subdivisions will one day recognize they could just as easily drive another 20 miles north and reach the tranquility of Pickens County.

Reports say some 70,000 people moved into Atlanta last year alone. We should enjoy our mostly traffic-free peace for as long as we can -- sooner or later they will find us and our wide-open spaces.