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Challenges of finding good employees discussed

       employer panel

A Workforce Needs Assessment panel discussion at Chattahoochee Tech let local HR people talk about the challenges of recruiting. A moderator from the Carl Vincent Institute looks on as (l-r) Joseph Simmons of Piedmont Mountainside; Keri Streicher, Royston; Lewis Williams of QSR; Judy Fowler, Amicalola EMC and Debbie Underkoffler, N. Ga. Staffing, discuss the issue.

       It’s a worker’s world when it comes to hiring and firing, according to a panel discussion as part of a workforce needs assessment at Chattahoochee Tech on April 13th.

Personnel directors at several of the largest local companies, and a staffing agency, all say that employers must do more to recruit employees and be more “flexible” when it comes to standards. The group was speaking as part of a Pickens County Needs Assessment conducted by Carl Vincent Institute of Government and hosted by Chattahoochee Tech as they look at what class offerings and other services the school should offer.

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online editions. 

 

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Concerned
-2 #1 Concerned 2018-05-01 08:54
Although I agree that employers need to be more lax on their standards. I do not agree that the current problem is based solely on employers. Yes not one employer that is in the area pays a livable wage. Unless of course you are in an educated position. I believe that our work force suffers more due to the lack of education and drive by employees as well. I am asked on a daily basis how I got my well paid job. My answer was pretty simple. I went to school. Got a degree and because of that have been in my field for more than 25 years. Our American society is more concerned with sporting events and political diatribe, than they are education. I blame the Baby Boomer generation myself. That generation started the sway from education along with Reagan. We can not compete on any technical development level with countries in Asia.because our citizens do not have the required skill set to do so.You don't have to like what I am saying but every single tech agency, every single economic expert tends to agree with this viewpoint. Maybe we should concentrate more on education instead of dumbing it down.

The one thing Democrats did that hurt our future was "The No Child Left Behind Act" which endeared less than average intellects to be able to keep progressing through and education system that failed them and us.
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kitty
-5 #2 kitty 2018-05-08 13:09
I disagree. One does not need a degree to succeed or make a good wage. A good work ethic and willingness to learn goes a long way. Being a sloth and not showing up to work on time does not help. I only had an Associates Degree and after that was self taught in Engineering. I retired 10 years ago at $30hr. On holidays I made 3x ---in the 1909's $75hr yup, I worked at a high tech plant until it was bought out by a division of Panasonic. But it was damn good pay. I crossed over to good pay in pharma. All it takes is gumption.Before I got my associates I was already making $19 hr ------ apprenticeships are good way to start as well.
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STFU
+6 #3 STFU 2018-05-10 07:12
Quoting kitty:
I disagree. One does not need a degree to succeed or make a good wage. A good work ethic and willingness to learn goes a long way. Being a sloth and not showing up to work on time does not help. I only had an Associates Degree and after that was self taught in Engineering. I retired 10 years ago at $30hr. On holidays I made 3x ---in the 1909's $75hr yup, I worked at a high tech plant until it was bought out by a division of Panasonic. But it was damn good pay. I crossed over to good pay in pharma. All it takes is gumption.Before I got my associates I was already making $19 hr ------ apprenticeships are good way to start as well.


All that success, and yet you keep crying about paying school tax. Something doesn't add up here, kitty.
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